1995 albums

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Lita Ford - Black
Indie pop
6th album

A periphery glance at Lita Ford's solo career will tell you that she was just yet another super tacky dime-a-dozen glam artist whose career took the alt-rock bullet in the early '90s, just like pretty much all of her contemporaries. In fairness, however, she did start out playing for the Runaways, revealing some tasteful punk roots as well, although she left the band due to creative differences with Joan Jett (and look who became more of an icon).

Because her particular brand of hard rock had become so passé in the mid-90sthat any attempt at revitalizing her career was a lost cause, this is the last album she made before promptly disappearing. In it, she jumps on the grunge bandwagon and makes a passable effort doing so, but (as you could imagine) it's absolutely nothing to write home about. I like it more than Extreme's attempt, I'll say that much, but all in all, I can't really give a strong recommendation to it. Maybe if you like glam metal for some reason, listen to Dancin' on the Edge or Dangerous Curves instead.

Or just... not, and listen to a respectable genre of music.

6/10





The The - Hanky Panky
Alternative country
5th album

Matt Johnson is a crazy motherfucker.

I was going through his whole discography, as I do, and I enjoyed to a certain extent all of the albums that I listened to (especially Soul Mining and Dusk). His style is rather unique and difficult to describe—it's post-punk, but it's also kinda like R.E.M. with those college rock vibes, and there's a little bit of new wave in there as well. Whatever it is, it's good-sounding and I like it.

Then he makes Hanky Panky, and my brain explodes.

This album is made up entirely of Hank Williams covers.

At first, I thought it was a fucking joke, but one look at the expression on Matt Johnson's face on that album cover will let you know right away that he's dead serious. And you know what the best part is? It's actually pretty good.

YouTube

Now, if you're expecting "proper" country music on this record, you're gonna be sorely disappointed. Matt Johnson knows that a true cover is not a rehash, but a reimagining, so every cover here is done in pure, unapologetic the The style. This will probably mean that most of you will find yourselves HATING this record profusely, especially if you happen to enjoy Hank Williams or if you haven't heard any of Hank's music in general.

I dig it mainly because I find Matt Johnson's brand of production very appealing, he's a great vocalist that I genuinely feel does Hank's poetry a lot of justice, and because I have a sense of humor. This album is really funny, and you kinda have to go into it recognizing that this is a very tongue-in-cheek kind of project. If you can't enjoy it, that's understandable, but for me, this was surprisingly enjoyable and may very well end up on my 3x3 when I'm all wrapped up with February '95.

7/10





Slash's Snakepit - It's Five O'Clock Somewhere
Hard rock
Debut album

Slash's Snakepit was a supergroup that aimed to combine the talents of Slash, drummer Matt Sorum, and guitarist Gilby Clarke (all from Guns N' Roses), bassist Mike Inez (from Alice in Chains), and lead vocalist Eric Dover (from Jellyfish). They put together just one album before disbanding, as supergroups tend to do.

Musically, the album is OKAY. Don't have a lot to say about it. Dover's vocals are the highlight. Slash's playing is boringly fantastic as usual. There are some rad cuts on it, like this one:

YouTube

But don't expect the whole album to sound as good.

6/10





Belly - King
Jangle pop
Sophomore album

A Throwing Muses member Tanya Donnelly leaves the band to start her own, and proceeds to make better music than them before falling off the face of the earth, since this style of music was unfortunately not "in" at the time.

This one's probably my favorite out of this bunch, and is equal in quality to their debut, Star. Their sound can range from soft and serene to bursting and energetic, with some tracks (such as my favorite, the title track "King") managing to strike a perfect balance between these two moods. Donnelly's sincere and melodic vocal style kinda reminds me of Dolores O'Riordan (RIP), which is really cool, and it seems that Belly even toured with the Cranberries at one point. Which makes sense, as the influence is very clear to my ears.

If you love some jangle pop, this one (as well as Star) may just be a must-listen for you.

7/10





Nevermore - Nevermore
Power metal
Debut album

I label this thing as "power metal," but I'm not sure if it really qualifies, since it's a far cry from sounding anything like Stratovarius or Iced Earth or what have you. It's not quite thrash, it's not quite regular metal, and it's not quite unique enough to be its own thing, so I don't understand what the fuck it's trying to be. I went with power metal just because that's what Wikipedia has decided to call it, and it sounds about right to me, but I'm not an expert.

Anyway, I think Warrel Dane does a GREAT job on the vocals on this thing, but the lyrical themes are another story. Lyrically, this is about as corny as you could ask for when it comes to power metal, and you need not look any further than the song "Timothy Leary," which pays tribute to the famous druggie psychologist, to understand this.

Quote
A wise man came across the sea
In search of LSD—PHILOSOPHY!
With open heart and open mind
To find the goodness in mankind
Quote
Chemicals improve the view
Visions now have bloomed in you
Windowpane is suffered bliss
A psychedelic kiss
Show to me your ideology
Do you perceive or are you sleeping?
Dont get me started on the fucking chorus:
Quote
Timothy Leary, where are you now
The world needs you, we're going down

Just awful. And sure, maybe it's stupid to care about lyrics on a heavy metal record, but to me, they're always gonna matter. It's also the way he sings them that makes it so hilarious to me, as well.

Now, to be fair, I'm picking on the absolute nadir of the album. The rest isn't quite this bad, and there are indeed some flashes of greatness here and there, like the song "Chrome Black Future," which is by far my favorite.

YouTube

This is really good, and I wish the album had more of this, but it kinda doesn't. Therefore, I'm overall kinda lukewarm on this thing.

6/10



February rankings:

#1. Slowdive - Pygmalion (7/10)
#2. Belly - King (7/10)
#3. The The - Hanky Panky (7/10)
#4. Stratovarius - Fourth Dimension (7/10)
#5. Slash's Snakepit - It's Five O'Clock Somewhere (6/10)
#6. Nevermore - Nevermore (6/10)
#7. Lita Ford - Black (6/10)
#8. The Pastels - Mobile Safari (6/10)
#9. Simple Minds - Good News from the Next World (6/10)
#10. Shania Twain - The Woman in Me (6/10)



Next:

Trisha Yearwood
No Use for a Name
Blink-182
Tricky
DJ Quik

The Blink-182 debut should be interesting.
Last Edit: January 30, 2019, 12:55:58 PM by Verbatim


 
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Trisha Yearwood - Thinkin' About You
Country
5th album

Nothing special, especially compared to the Shania Twain album that I previously covered.

5/10





No Use for a Name - ¡Leche Con Carne!
Melodic hardcore
3rd album

I'm not normally one for this group's particular brand of punk music—but this record was made a little earlier in their career, when their sound was much more aggressive and biting while still maintaining elements of accessibility through its sense of melody, as well as their general ethos. I'm not in love with it, but it must be one of the last half-decent punk albums ever made, given the genre's ultimate shift towards something much more difficult to stomach in the mid '90s.

7/10





Blink-182 - Cheshire Cat
Pop punk
Debut album

SPEAKING OF, one of the punk coffin's biggest nail-pushers was none other than Blink-182—which is not to say that I particularly hate this band, or anything. I mean, sure—the vocals are incessant and whiny, and all of their songs sound exactly the same, but on this record at least, I think they successfully managed to bring a lot of color and personality to the table, which you could argue a lot of their contemporaries lacked a bit. The dumb little skits and gags that occur here and there throughout the album do bring in some humor, even if it's goofy and childish, because the refusal to grow up has kinda always been one of the core themes of Blink-182's music, and I think they own it quite well.

It's also worth noting that the album was made on a tight-ass budget, and I'm always impressed whenever an artist is able to create a finished project under dire straits like that. It's kinda inspiring.

6/10





Tricky - Maxinquaye
Trip hop
Debut album

All right, this one's gonna be tough. This guy made music with Massive Attack back in the day before embarking on a solo career where he dropped this weird-ass album for his debut.

Considered by several publications to be one of the best albums of 1995, if not the best (Robert Christgau gave it an A+, for Christ's sake), it's a record that is commonly cited to be the birthplace of the trip hop genre, which blends the wooziest and most down-tempo elements of hip hop and electronic music to create a "trippy" sound. This album in particular also throws in some ambient, jazz, rock, and even a little bit of reggae in there, as well, so it's quite the eclectic and experimental work of art.

The effect created by Tricky's production, in collaboration with Mark Saunders, is a distinctly druggy and heavily disorienting sound that makes you feel lost in a sedative haze. Tricky has a very interesting voice and vocal style on his own, but the lovely singer-songwriter Martina Topley-Bird is prominently featured, as well. They'll often trade places between leading and backing, and they complement each other rather nicely while maintaining the record's unevenness and off-kilter nature.

I like this album quite a bit, but as far as it being one of the best albums of 1995, I don't know if I personally share that enthusiasm. It has remarkable moments, but it also has its weaker points, and not all of its songs are as well-produced or as interesting as its best tracks, making it uneven not only in sound or concept, but also in overall quality.

The album does seem to be rich with themes from a lyrical standpoint, however, and admittedly, I haven't really looked into the meaning behind the lyrics just yet. I'll give this one a few extra listens because of it, and it may turn out later on that it's grown on me more. The potential is there for this to be my favorite album of February '95, but I personally don't see it ending up on my final list when I'm all finished with this project.

7/10





DJ Quik - Safe + Sound
Hip hop
3rd album

A solid album. Compton spitter DJ Quik raps good and produces all his own beats, which I have a lot of respect for, especially when all the beats end up nice. If you don't like G-funk, though, look elsewhere, since Quik is one of the guys who pioneered that sound. He's also a dirty rapper like Too Short (some of the first words on the album: "All I give a fuck about is music and sex"), so if that's not something you can stomach, I'd pass this one up, too.

I wouldn't blame you, since that's not something I can stomach, either. I gave Too Short's album a 5/10 for being too hung down in that degenerate-ass shit. It just got tedious after awhile. But on Safe + Sound, Quik's breadth of subject matter is marginally wider, and there are only three or four songs out of the seventeen available that focus on the grossest details of his sexual excursions. Even on those songs, it's hard to deny Quik's talent as a lyricist and MC. His flows are on point, and there's a track on here where the chorus goes, "if it don't make dollars, it don't make sense"—even if you don't agree with that sentiment, you have to admit that's a pretty clever line.

The only part of the album that I fucking hate (and I've hated this particular moment more than anything else that I've covered so far) are the two counterpart tracks "Don't You Eat It!" and "Can I Eat it?" which both focus on the audacious and scholarly topic of cunnilingus. The former isn't actually a song; it's more of a skit that serves as a prelude to the latter track where a man (I don't know if it's Quik, or someone else) offers to go down on his partner while they're in bed or some shit (which gets rape-y as the female character says "no" three times, but he chooses to go down on her anyway). As this is happening, these audible and extremely over-the-top licking sounds can be heard, which is easily the most disgusting and uncomfortable shit I've ever heard on a hip hop album. The guy seems to notice that something is wrong, though, and he screams as a devilish voice is heard: "You dare put your lips in between hips? You don't know where that pussy's been! DON'T EAT THE COOCHIE!"

I'm not kidding. This is a thing that happens on the album. It's obviously played for laughs, and not supposed to be taken as seriously I'm choosing to take it. I'm just trying to express that I don't find any humor in this shit. It's embarrassing.

But anyway, with that dumbass shit aside, it's actually still a solid album, like I said before. It just has a few ridiculous moments, and you'll either find them hilarious or you'll absolutely hate them. To me, it's just music. I find them easy to overlook, given that the album is 60 minutes, and its worst songs are rather short. I don't know. Take it or leave it; I may enjoy the record overall, but I'm not gonna give it a strong recommendation, or anything. Just for those of you who don't get easily offended by stupid hip hop lyrics.

Here's one of the better tracks to give you a sense of what you're getting:

YouTube

7/10



Coming up next, we have some records by Energy Orchard, Atari Teenage Riot, PJ Harvey, Mike Watt, and Adina Howard.

Technically, I'm also supposed to listen to an album called Cerebral Caustic by the Fall, but because of the way I listen to music, I think I'm gonna put that record off for now. The Fall's discography is gargantuan, and I don't really feel like putting myself through it at this time.
Last Edit: February 18, 2019, 02:40:01 AM by Verbatim


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Skip the rest, listen to this and call it a day. Eat shit also.


 
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Skip the rest, listen to this and call it a day. Eat shit also.
help me understand what i'm supposed to be listening for when it comes to this style of music

what separates the good extreme metal albums from the bad ones

because to me they mostly blend together and i could theoretically enjoy any of them if i were in the right mood, but i would never really be able to tell you if what i'm listening to is "good" beyond my own limited standards and sensibilities
Last Edit: February 23, 2019, 02:37:34 PM by Verbatim


Jim | Mythic Inconceivable!
 
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Skip the rest, listen to this and call it a day. Eat shit also.
help me understand what i'm supposed to be listening for when it comes to this style of music

what separates the good extreme metal albums from the bad ones

because to me they mostly blend together and i could theoretically enjoy any of them if i were in the right mood, but i would never really be able to tell you if what i'm listening to is "good" beyond my own limited standards and sensibilities
Good songwriting and engaging, unique riffs are paramount for me.  Repetitive song structures that amount to what is essentially a poppy verse-chorus-verse-chorus composition neuter everything the song had going for it to begin with, if it even had anything.  Repetition is a wonderful tool when used in a bleak or hypnotic manner like you'll find in the band Mgla, but if your entire song is ABABAB I lose interest in whatever it is you're trying to say.  "Cool" and unique riffs are pretty subjective, but I think the bottom line is a riff shouldn't be nauseatingly derivative and it shouldn't be so limp wristed that the song loses its momentum. 

On Panzerfaust, Darkthrone pulls a ton of influence from Celtic Frost.  For an example, here's Fenriz, one half of the brain behind Darkthrone, describing what makes Celtic Frost so great.
#Invalid YouTube Link#
It's hard to accurately describe what makes a riff *good*, but part of what Fenriz is trying to get across here is Tom G. Warrior's use of intense chromaticism to the point where the riffs start to sound out of key and therefore "wrong," but played with enough confidence that you begin to buy what he's saying.  Some of the riffs are almost nauseating, for lack of a better term, like on the track Procreation of the Wicked.  The rest is difficult to describe and it's something you just have to hear. 

Panzerfaust is still a Black Metal album from the Helvete Norwegian scene so of course it has those tremolo picked atmospheric riffs which thrive on repetition and melody.  Just like any other riff, it's hard to describe exactly what makes them great, but for me the riffs on Panzerfaust (and all early Darkthrone albums) call to mind the harsh, cold wind and snow stinging the skin and making life miserable for all but the most resilient peoples.  Under more genial conditions the melodies are pleasant, albeit somewhat dark; bolstered by the incessant, pounding drums and the inaccessible distortion and production it becomes violent and ugly.  Paramount for me is how well the album illustrates its imagery.  Sometimes there are clear cut ways of going about this, but for the most part you just have to listen to the kings of their respective genres and learn to hear what makes them great.  The rules of one genre or style don't apply to all styles or genres, and sometimes they don't even apply to albums in that genre or style.  With this style of Black Metal they took a lot of inspiration from nature itself in the same way that bands like Godflesh took inspiration from industrial environments and the sounds they produce, and it's clear when you listen to them.

EDIT:  Something else that didn't come to mind when I wrote this is cohesive songwriting achieved by tying together riffs and melodies in logical and interesting ways.  Playing a riff with a distinct phrasing and tonal center and subsequently playing a riff that is entirely dissimilar from it is referred to as "riff salad."  It comes across as extremely amateur and leaves you unfulfilled.  It's like someone stopping mid-sentence and changing the subject entirely. 
Last Edit: February 23, 2019, 07:23:38 PM by Jim


 
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Energy Orchard - Pain Killer
Basic rock
4th album

Probably the most obscure band I've covered so far, and that status is not undeserved.

Basically, an Irish group of Van Morrison wannabes make the most bland rock music imaginable. On previous records, they dared, on occasion, to incorporate some Celtic roots into their sound, which was actually quite nice, but there's not much of that to be found here. Not that it would've been a resounding selling point anyway. Do not bother.

5/10





Atari Teenage Riot - 1995 (aka Delete Yourself!)
Digital hardcore
Debut album

"Digital hardcore" is essentially an adrenaline-fueled, blood-pumping affectation of electronica when combined with the vibe and ethos of hardcore punk music. It's very loud and very abrasive and most of you wouldn't like it.

This is a GREAT album, though, and if you enjoy the music of, say, Death Grips (especially for their punkier side), then I would absolutely consider this a must-listen.

If you've seen the third Fast & Furious movie, Tokyo Drift, then you've already heard the best song on the album. Which is unfortunate, but I hope that doesn't discourage you from trying out the whole album.

YouTube

The song in general represents the album's sound very well. If you don't like what you're hearing, the album's probably not for you.

My biggest problem with the group is their politics—not that I disagree with them, but because it's practically impossible to disagree with them. You see, part of the group's whole appeal is that, sure, they may be making this intensely aggressive music, but it's only because of how politically conscience they are. They're directing that anger towards a greater evil. And what greater evil, you may ask?

...Nazis.

Yeah. Atari Teenage Riot is taking a hardline stance on Nazis and fascism: they're bad, and this is what they want you to start riots over. They have a song on this album that they, apparently, play at every single one of their shows, and they'll never stop until every Nazi is dead.

Obviously, I'm not saying it's bad to hate Nazis or anything. It's just a little... easy? And not the most political stance?

Whatever, the music is still good and that's ultimately what matters. So good, in fact, that I think this is probably my favorite album for this month.

8/10

Oh, and if you were gonna listen to it, do notice that 1995 and Delete Yourself! are the same album; the latter is a 1997 re-release that changed only the title and the cover, so don't get confused by that. Here's what the new cover looks like:

Delete Yourself!

I'm not sure which one I prefer, but I went with the original 1995 cover because, after all, this is the 1995 thread.





PJ Harvey - To Bring You My Love
Alternative rock
3rd album

I think this album is somewhat of an alt-rock classic, so I'm not sure how much I need to talk about it. It's really good—Harvey's husky vocals are pretty powerful and bluesy, and even though I'd argue that she doesn't always sing "well" in the conventional sense, she embraces the idiosyncratic elements of her voice in such a way that every note feels deliberate and very impassioned or soulful.

She can get a little hamfisted at times, though, like on "I Think I'm a Mother," where the entire song is sung with the lowest possible voice she can make, and it does sound quite silly. It doesn't ruin the song or make it bad, but I personally can't listen to it without grinning.

My favorite tracks on the record are probably any of the heavier ones, such as "Meet ze Monsta" or "Long Snake Moan," but it also offers some really cool tracks that are less heavy, like "Working for the Man," which has this really sly instrumentation that slinks along like a cat, or one of the more popular songs on the record, "Down by the Water," which is a fun track that tells a rather grim but nonetheless interesting story in its lyrics.

YouTube

I, for one, quite like it. Give it a try, it's pretty accessible.

8/10





Mike Watt - Ball-Hog or Tugboat?
Alternative rock
Debut album

This one's pretty wild. So, Mike Watt is a bassist who played in a number of bands, like the Minutemen, and made a name for himself in the '90s before embarking on a solo career. This is his first "solo" album, but "solo" is a term I use loosely, because this album has this crazy yet ambitious gimmick where Watt pretty much formed a new ad hoc band for each of its seventeen cuts, all of which feature a menagerie of big names in the alternative rock world, including Eddie Veder, Henry Rollins, Dave Grohl, Krist Novoselic, Flea, Carla Bozulich, J Mascis from Dinosaur Jr, Mark Lanegan from Screaming Trees, Kathleen Hanna from Bikini Kill, and MANY more—most of whom I don't even recognize. Even Mike D shows up out of nowhere on one track. This album is a collaborative giant and every '90s alternative fans' wet dream, basically.

Does that mean it's good, though? Actually, I think it is. It's an extremely uneven and almost schizophrenic mess at points, but I think that's part of the experience.

Instrumentally, it's all over the place. You got your standard rock 'n' roll fare, which comprises most of the material here, but you also have these random flavors of blues, country, and a little bit of jazz, punk, and spoken word, too. All sorts of weird shit, and it's all done weirdly. There's a song on here called "Piss-Bottle Man," which is sung and performed very matter-of-factly as if it's not a bizarre subject.

The album seems self-aware about its oddball nature, which is part of what makes it work for me. For example, there's a cut on here called "Intense Song for Madonna to Sing." Naturally, you'd expect there to be vocals, but... it's an instrumental. That's fucking hilarious.

There's even one part of the album that aims to completely disrupt the experience entirely and make things awkward and uncomfortable. Kathleen Hanna's "contribution" is a phone call where she aggressively informs Watt that she has no interest in being on the album, because one of her friends was raped by one of the other collaborators (though she doesn't name anybody) before casually asking him to return her Annie soundtrack that he had borrowed. It's... fucking odd, and it wasn't until later when I did some research that I discoered that this segment of the album was merely a bit, and nobody was actually raped (or, at least, I think/hope that's what that entails). I think Mike Watt is a pretty ballsy motherfucker to include something like that in his album, and it's this moment on the album where I decided I was listening to a great work of art.

I don't even feel as though I fully comprehend this record, or what it's doing, or why it exists, but for what it's worth, I enjoyed a significant amount of what I heard. I do still think it's a little bit too uneven for me to give it the 8/10 that I want to, but it's still very much worth checking out and will most certainly top my 3x3 chart when this is finished.

7/10





Adina Howard - Do You Wanna Ride?
R&B
Debut album

...

4/10

Next.





Quicksand - Manic Compression
Alternative metal
Sophomore album

To me, this is a genre that lives and dies on the quality of its riffs. If you don't have good riffs, and you're making riff-based music, and you're not an insanely talented auteur producer or multi-instrumentalist like Trent Reznor or something, then you're probably not making very interesting music. You're probably making bland, forgettable music. So what does that say for these guys?

It's all right. Definitely forgettable, but decent if you're into the genre. I think their first album was a little better. "East 3rd St." and "Supergenius" are good cuts, and there's not an outright bad song on the album, but there's nothing particularly unique or special about them.

6/10

I think there's enough material on this record to MAYBE justify a 7/10, but my decision comes down to lack of memorability. I don't remember much of this record after first listening to it, and nothing is really compelling me to come back to it.





Jewel - Pieces of You
Folk
Debut album

This style of music is normally a bit little too sugary-sweet for my sensibilities, especially when looking at the subject matters she typically sings about, but there are a number of songs that delve into some startlingly dark territory, and of course, these wind up being my favorites on the record. I'm especially talking about songs like the title track or "Daddy." I don't love these songs unconditionally, but they give an otherwise emotionally diabetic record into something that has a bit of an edge to it. It worked out, and it seemed to have worked out for a lot of other people as well, as this is one of the best selling albums of 1995 (apparently).

7/10
Maybe a little generous, it could be a 6/10 but I'm keeping it as a 7/10 for now.
If you're into soft and cuddly folk music like this, it might just be a 10/10 for you.





Wax - 13 Unlucky Numbers
Pop punk
Sophomore album

This record is just over 20 minutes, which is probably the ideal dosage. I can only take so much pop punk.

I actually kinda like these guys, though. Between the Blink-182 debut that I covered, as well as the No Use for a Name, I think Wax actually put out the best album. I think they have more energy, MUCH better riffs, the better vocalist, and all-around the more cutting-edge sound (for '95, obviously).

Not to mention, I think Wax's debut, What Else Can We Do, might be one of the best pop punk albums I've ever heard, but I've only been able to find it on Spotify. There's not even a Wikipedia article on it. But check that one out, too, if you're interested.

7/10





Steve Earle - Train a Comin'
Country
5th album

Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Steve Earle—my favorite country singers, as someone who doesn't like the genre.

Steve Earle was never really a pure country artist, which is what makes him so palatable for me. He also has one of the coolest-sounding voices in the genre. You're probably familiar with "Copperhead Road" or "Guitar Town," both of which are great songs that manage to blend country with harder or catchier rock sounds which make them easier for non-country fans to digest.

Train a Comin', on the other hand, doesn't really contain any of Earle's more well-known hits, and instead takes it back to the roots a little bit. This would be disappointing, but he still has the voice, and the country roots we're talking about is the era where country music was about storytelling, where the stories being told have something useful to take away from them after listening.

And for that purpose, I think this album succeeds, for the most part, at what it's setting out to do. Sure, there's a couple of trite songs here and there, like "Nothin' Without You," but there's still great stuff like "Tom Ames' Prayer" and "Ben McCulloch."

I dunno, in terms of country music, I think you could do a lot worse.

7/10





Porcupine Tree - The Sky Moves Sideways
Progressive rock
3rd album

While not even close to a bad record, I would consider this to be a slight disappointment coming off their debut and sophomore releases, On the Sunday of Life... and Up the Downstair, which are both sonically beautiful 8/10 albums that are exciting and forthright in terms of quality.

This one's still good, but it's not as good, and it's very difficult to explain why, especially when it's frequently cited among Porcupine fans as one of their weakest outputs. It doesn't really help that "psychedelic" music like this has always come with the punchline that it was all made on drugs, or that you need to be on drugs in order to fully appreciate it. And while Steven Wilson has made zero compunctions about his drug abuse (Up the Downstair opens up with a message outright stating that the record was made under the influence), I don't think it's the case that the listener must also indulge in order to enjoy practically any kind of music.

But when you put out a spacey, pretentious-ass record like this (and it IS pretentious), it really kinda undermines that point a little bit. There are multiple 15+ minute ambient compositions on this album that, while impressively made and overall "good-sounding" (and that really is the best adjective I can come up with here), do not justify their length at all, and instead threaten to bore most listeners, because they aren't very engaging or challenging. They're kinda just there for you to zone out to. It's good "zoning out" music, nothing more.

I happened to enjoy it decently enough in spite of this, but the way the music is made makes it very difficult for me to put into words just what I like about it, because it's very apparent to me that all the reasons why I enjoy the record would be the same exact reasons that someone else would hate it. I don't know how to recommend this album, or if it's even worth it.

Why couldn't they have just released something straightforward in 1995? Christ. Just listen to their other shit.

7/10



All right, before we close the books on February, I have a couple of amendments:

Upon reconsideration, the No Use for a Name album ¡Leche con Carne! is a 6/10, not a 7/10. I also relistened to Tricky's Maxinquaye when I was in a mood more well-suited for the music, and decided to bump it up to an 8/10 from the 7/10 that I initially gave it. I reserve the right to change my ratings as I see fit, though I'll do my best to not be TOO fickle about it. It's important that I remain consistent, and I was simply beginning to notice that I was throwing out more undeserved 7/10s than was perhaps necessary.

Now I'm done, I think. Here's a 3x3 chart of my favorite albums from this month of 1995.


Top left best, bottom right worst. All of these are worth listening to at least once.

And here's the one from January, as well, for good measure.

In terms of overall rankings, I would still say, as much as I like the Atari Teenage Riot, I still prefer the previously covered Swans record, The Great Annihilator. That record still rocks my socks, and it's gonna take a truly special album to dethrone it for the time being.



March is gonna be a fun month; I'm already seeing a lot of great bands that I already listen to.

Coming up, though, I'll be listening to Mike + The Mechanics, Grip Inc, Warrant, Adam Ant, and Zard.
Last Edit: March 06, 2019, 09:59:27 PM by Verbatim


 
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Mike + The Mechanics - Beggar on a Beach of Gold
Pop rock
4th album

This was a supergroup formed by Genesis guitarist Mike Rutherford, who combined the vocal talents of Paul Carrack and Paul Young with the drumming of Peter Van Hooke. If you don't recognize any of those names, I wouldn't worry about it too much. These guys never really made a big splash, and the music they made was pretty bone-dry, in my opinion.

This particular record is a minor improvement over everything they put out before. There's a handful of neat keyboard arrangements on some songs, and the overall songwriting is noticeably better, too. But, still, for the most part, it's just very plain and unchallenging rock music that doesn't sound like it belongs anywhere near the mid-'90s.

6/10





Grip Inc. - Power of Inner Strength
Groove metal
Debut album

This was a band formed by Slayer's ex-drummer Dave Lombardo (the first time he dropped out), so if you happen to be interested in Slayer's music, you may also find interest in this old project. Just keep in mind that the tempos are less thrash, more groove on this record, and they kinda sound more like Pantera to me more than they do Slayer.

Personally, I'm into it. Vocalist Gus Chambers doesn't hold a candle to Tom Araya, but then, few metal vocalists do. It's still as hard-hitting and as aggressive as you'd want it to be, though, and every song on the record packs a forceful punch.

It's not a shining example of excellence in the genre, or anything, but it works as a supplement to one's taste in heavy metal, assuming such taste had already been acquired.

7/10





Warrant - Ultraphobic
Heavy metal
4th album

These are the guys that made that insipid "Cherry Pie" song, which is somewhat of a glam metal anthem, and probably one of my favorite guilty pleasure songs of all time. That said, I'm not a huge fan of these guys.

This album was okay, though. There did come a point in their career where their sound had noticeably matured and became somewhat easier to take seriously, and I believe that happened with their previous album, Dog Eat Dog. Granted, that album was slightly better than this one, but Ultraphobic is still by no means a bad record—especially if, like them, you still find yourself enjoying (ironically or otherwise) that '80s hair metal aesthetic.

I'm not gonna give it a strong recommendation, or anything, but I'm not opposed to giving it a positive rating, either.

6/10





Adam Ant - Wonderful
Alt rock
5th album

I hate to say it, but I think I like Adam Ant more as a personality than I do as a musician—especially as a solo artist. The guy has undeniable charisma, attributed primarily to his Bowie-esque campiness, but after separating from the Ants to make poptastic radio-friendly new wave music, I was genuinely struggling to find a single album of his that did not utterly bore me, with 1990's Manners & Physique being the nadir of it.

This album, thankfully, finds Ant embarking on fresh territory—acoustic, ballad-heavy rock music. In other words, he's kinda playing it safe on this one. It's a hard album to outright dislike at face value, which doesn't sound very exciting—and it's not—but it's an objective upgrade over an album that is easy to outright dislike at face value, which could be said of all of his previous solo work.

The sad part is that I can't even really recommend this very strongly, as the best thing I can say about it is that it "doesn't suck" within the greater context of his entire discography, and if you're an Adam Ant fan, you've probably already heard it. It's just one of those weird cases, I guess.

Hey, did you know that the Nine Inch Nails song "Physical" is actually an Adam and the Ants cover???

YouTube

6/10





Zard - Forever You
Pop rock
6th album

For a Japanese band, Zard's music sounds, for the most part, relatively mundane and heavily inspired by Western rock music. Izumi Sakai is a great vocalist, but she's also a very straightforward one. I was kinda disappointed by that going into their discography, but at least this album in particular has a bit more going for it instrumentally. Some of their catchier songs turn up on this thing, and I'll share a couple examples here:

YouTube

YouTube

These are some of the more "Japanese-sounding" songs on the record, so if anything remotely Japanese makes you cringe (especially if it's poppy and uplifting), I'd stay far away from these. That said, I personally found them kinda refreshing, and I do tend to give extra points to albums for being refreshing and different.

Obviously, there's no way for me to gauge the quality of the lyrics, but fortunately, the way I rate music has more to do with how it sounds in general, rather than whatever the lyrics are trying to say. I normally only start reading into the lyrics once I've already decided that I love a record anyway, and I don't necessarily love Zard's music. It's just rather nice and pleasant.

7/10



This next batch is gonna be exciting for me:

Radiohead
Mad Season
Goo Goo Dolls
Collective Soul
Elastica
Last Edit: March 17, 2019, 03:19:16 PM by Verbatim


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the dj spins and cuts me
           hardcore will never die
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )               https://youtu.be/uDF4cwAghAc
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )
) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็
what are you listening to all these albums on?


 
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what are you listening to all these albums on?
wherever i can find them tbh

usually youtube or spotify, if it's not on one it's surely on the other

sometimes i'm forced to piece together individual songs from the album since the full thing isn't always available, or no convenient playlist is made for it


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the dj spins and cuts me
           hardcore will never die
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )               https://youtu.be/uDF4cwAghAc
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )
) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็
what are you listening to all these albums on?
wherever i can find them tbh

usually youtube or spotify, if it's not on one it's surely on the other

sometimes i'm forced to piece together individual songs from the album since the full thing isn't always available, or no convenient playlist is made for it
i see

what hardware are you listening to them on?


 
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i see

what hardware are you listening to them on?
just some cheap headphones plugged into my laptop, nothing fancy

i wouldn't call myself an audiophile by any means


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the dj spins and cuts me
           hardcore will never die
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )               https://youtu.be/uDF4cwAghAc
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )
) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ )
: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็: ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็็ ) : ส็็็็็็็็็็็็็็
i see

what hardware are you listening to them on?
just some cheap headphones plugged into my laptop, nothing fancy

i wouldn't call myself an audiophile by any means
damn that’s absolute torture


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Excuse me, I'm full of dog poison
i see

what hardware are you listening to them on?
just some cheap headphones plugged into my laptop, nothing fancy

i wouldn't call myself an audiophile by any means


I wouldn't consider myself an audiophile either, but at least get some decent headphones. kz zst's are like $20 and are infinitely better than most low end headphones you see.


 
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Radiohead - The Bends
Alternative rock
Sophomore album

In spite of the fact that I've never really been hugely into Radiohead, this album—according to Wikipedia—is consistently cited, and among thousands of publications, to be the single best album released in the year 1995. This is it. This is the one. I can stop this thread right now, because this album is #1.

Eh, but not really. It's good and all, but I can already think of fifteen records from '95 that I would rank higher. In fact, I think I actually prefer Radiohead's debut, Pablo Honey, just a little bit more, to be perfectly honest. People often dismiss that album as a bog-standard grunge affair that's carried entirely by the one Radiohead song everybody knows, and that's fair, but here's the thing—"Creep" is still a really fucking good song, and The Bends, while undeniably more inspired, consistent, and closer to the cutting edge than their debut was overall, simply lacks a single that I consider to be as good or as powerful.

In fact, of the record's many singles, "My Iron Lung" is one of only two that I would consider to be particularly good. Songs like "High and Dry" and "Fake Plastic Trees" fail to leave an impression, but not as much as the title track, which straight-up bores me to tears.

That said, it's still a solid rock album, but that's all there is to it for me. If it turned out that this really WAS the best album of 1995, I would probably cut my journey short, because it wouldn't be worth it.

My favorite song, "Street Spirit," happens to be the closing track. I'll link it here, but just keep that in mind before listening to it.

YouTube

7/10





Mad Season - Above
Grunge
Debut album

Mad Season was a short-lived supergroup that combined the talents of vocalist Layne Staley (Alice in Chains), guitarist Mike McCready (Pearl Jam), drummer Barrett Martin (Screaming Trees), and bassist John Baker Saunders (The Walkabouts). This was their only album, and I'm happy to report that it's a fucking great one.

That being said, I am a little biased. Layne Staley happens to be my favorite vocalist of all time, across all genres, and this record showcases his talents very well. It's also just an aural feast for grunge fans, because unlike so many of the other supergroups I've covered already, these guys actually managed to get together and do exactly what you'd hope a supergroup would be able to accomplish.

Every song is unique and has its own modus operandi, from the warm and nostalgic "River of Deceit," the woozy and discordant "I Don't Know Anything," or the chilling and cavernous "All Alone." The lyrics are about as introspective and as soul-baring as you'd expect, and the bluesy grooves are prominent and intoxicating.

YouTube

This is my favorite March '95 album so far, and it's gonna be difficult to top. I recommend this one to ALL rock fans, really. Even if you're not into the style, I think you have to appreciate what they were able to accomplish here, considering how often supergroups tend to disappoint.

8/10





Goo Goo Dolls - A Boy Named Goo
Alternative rock
5th album

Before they came out with "Iris," which is an incredible song, Goo Goo Dolls actually started out as a punk band—and not a very good one, either, if I'm honest. It was either this album or the album just before that marked a transitional period for the band, where they began to adopt a much more palatable alt-rock sound in the same way that many-a-punk act would do back in the day.

This usually results in the group making considerably worse music in order to appeal to a broader mass, but in the case of the Goo Goo Dolls, it wound up being a good decision for them, since the quality of this album (though it's by no means outstanding) does eclipse pretty much all of their previous work, in my opinion.

This is the record that produced "Name," a soft ballad that wound up becoming the group's most successful pre-"Iris" single. I'm not crazy about it, but it's easy to see how, with singles like this, the band really was beginning to start playing into their newfound strengths.

YouTube

All-around, the album is decent, but frankly a little sonically blasé for my tastes. I can't deny that it's an improvement over what they were making in the late '80s to early '90s, though.

6/10





Collective Soul - Collective Soul
Post-grunge
2nd album

This record is kind of similar to a Pablo Honey, in the sense that, while the band isn't really doing anything new or creative or adventurous on this album, and at the time, it may have seemed a little redundant or even boring when it was released, I think we can kinda look back to albums like this in the current year with a little bit more appreciation.

Redundant or not, these guys really knew how to jam. Ed Roland's charismatic and energetic vocals are pretty infectious, and the band seems to have a powerful grasp of how to carry a groove while making some simple, bona fide rock music with some grunge-y Pearl Jam-esque undertones.

The other similarity the record shares with Pablo Honey, however, is that it has one major stand-out single a la "Creep" that kinda overshadows the rest of the album and, in some ways, the band's entire discography. The song "Shine" from their debut album is still my favorite Collective Soul song, but "December" is one of the higher-ups as well. It's just such a cool song, even if it's a little overplayed.

YouTube

7/10





Elastica - Elastica
Punk rock
Debut album

The "new wave of new wave," Elastica was a short-lived Britpop band who made some off-kilter alternative punk music in the '90s, starting with this very album. It's pretty cool, and it seems pretty popular in retrospect. Don't overlook it.

YouTube

7/10





Moby - Everything Is Wrong
Electronica
3rd album

Finally, something outside of rock music.

EDM mastermind Moby did not sleep through 1995, giving us an album that is not only as blood-pumping and gratifying as his previous two LPs, but finds a way to combine, quite beautifully, what made them work so well—the ecstatic, inventive, and adrenaline-fueled breakbeats of his self-titled debut with the gorgeous, layered, and meticulously produced ambient soundscapes of his sophomore album.

The result is pretty awesome, to say the least—the album art paints a nice picture of what it feels like to listen to—but it does tend to suffer a bit from sounding a little bit dated at points, and your ability to stomach some of these moments will probably inform how much you'll ultimately enjoy the record.

I, for one, think there's a charming cheesiness to a lot of the record's production, and that's not even to say it's all cheese—there's some genuinely kick-ass beats on this record. I'm just trying to say that the era in which it was created is very transparent, and I hope you don't let that bother you too much.

Of course, if you hate electronica or rave music in general, stay far away from this one. There's nothing for you here.

YouTube

8/10





E-40 - In a Major Way
Hip hop
Sophomore album

Another solid rap record, but compared to the Smif 'n' Wessun album that I covered way back when I first made this thread, this one is gonna seem pretty standard by comparison.

Still, E-40 is no pedestrian on the mic. I'm still gonna give it the same score by virtue of the man being a VERY talented spitter and lyricist (even though his weird vocal inflections are somewhat of an acquired taste), and the production here is by no means bad—it's just not breaking new ground for '90s hip hop in the way that the Roots were, for example.

7/10





2Pac - Me Against the World
Hip hop
3rd album

I was pretty stoked when I noticed I had a 2Pac album in the March section to listen to. It wasn't All Eyez On Me, but it is the only album he has where he doesn't intentionally misspell a word in the title, so for that, I was expecting to listen to some very down-to-earth, introspective rapping from one of the legends.

And yeah, sure, I got that. But the overall experience of the album can be summed up with the phrase, "That was pretty good," which is somewhat of an underwhelming response when we're talking about one of, if not THE most beloved and legendary emcees to ever do it.

I just don't really have much to say, which feels lame to say, but I'm just being honest.

The production was pretty good. I really like how chilled out it is. Every song had a place and purpose. His rapping was pretty good. The lyrics were pretty good. It was all just... pretty good. Nothing more, nothing less. I guess I can say that the quality of consistency throughout the tracks is absolutely through the roof on this one, because every single song is precisely as good as the last one you heard. I couldn't say the same about his first two records, which all had their definite peaks and valleys. Here, everything is good. But nothing is all that GREAT.

I'd definitely rank it above the E-40, though.

7/10





Annie Lennox - Medusa
Adult contemporary
Sophomore album

Annie Lennox was the vocal half of the '80s British synthpop duo Eurythmics. If you don't immediately recognize the name, you've no doubt heard the song "Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)" at the very least.

After splitting up in 1990 or so, Lennox went off on a solo career, and, after releasing her debut Diva in '92, decided that her next record would be comprised entirely of covers.

I'm not usually one who finds this concept terribly compelling—obviously, I think covers are great, but fifty minutes of nothing but covers is not exactly my idea of an interesting album. I'd simply rather spend that time listening to original material. Of course, Matt Johnson was able to pull it off, so it's not like there are no exceptions to this rule, but in order to make a great covers album, you not only have to make each and every song your own, but I must be able to walk away from the record thinking that I just listened to a completely original work.

Does Lennox succeed here? Eh, maybe partially.

On Medusa, Lennox offers her take on a bunch of old songs from a relatively broad variety of decades, eras, and genres, providing them with silky smooth yet vocally-focused pop instrumentation. There's a minimal dance vibe, but this style of pop music is truthfully more about showcasing how good of a singer Lennox is (yawn).

There are songs by '60s MoTown groups like the Temptations on this thing, as well as some relatively obscure British synthpop and new wave bands, such as the Blue Nile and the Lover Speaks, from which the opening track and most popular cut from the album is derived: "No More 'I Love You's," which is a song you'd immediately recognize upon hearing it, assuming you didn't recognize the title.

YouTube

Honestly, though, beyond that track and the covers of "Downtown Lights" and "Thin Line Between Love and Hate" by the Persuaders, there's really not much here to talk about. Lennox is a very talented vocalistm to be sure, but if you're like me, and you don't care to listen to good singing for the sake of it, most of the material found here will likely just bore you, or (worst case scenario) make you want to listen to the original songs instead. Look no further than the Neil Young cover for an example of that.

6/10





Matthew Sweet - 100% Fun
Alternative rock
5th album

Possibly the shittiest album cover so far?

It's okay, though. I would just listen to his previous album Girlfriend instead.

6/10



I was supposed to listen to a Linda Ronstadt album, too, but her back catalog is way too extensive for me to care right now. Same with Stevie Wonder, who would be coming up, but I can't be assed.

Instead, we got:

Sleeper
Seefeel
Ned's Atomic Dustbin
The Tea Party
Monster Magnet

A BUNCH OF NOTHING (maybe i'll be surprised, though)
Last Edit: April 07, 2019, 09:43:38 PM by Verbatim


 
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Neds atomic dustbin is p cool fam


 
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Neds atomic dustbin is p cool fam
you right


 
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Sleeper - Smart
Britpop
Debut album

I only know these guys for their cover of Blondie's "Atomic" from Trainspotting, which is a fantastic cover, but this album was made well before that cover was recorded, so I can't say my expectations for this record were too high.

It's decent. It's an unfortunate case where the opening track is the best track, so every song that follows doesn't quite live up to it. None of the songs are bad, but nonetheless, it's a record that leaves me feeling a little cold.

6/10





Seefeel - Succour
Ambient IDM
Sophomore album

Here's an interesting one by post-rock pioneers Seefeel.

Not for the impatient, this record is essentially a collection of these simple, sorta-catchy-but-also-kinda-unnerving minimalist ambient beats that loop incessantly with very little (if anything) in the way of instrumental build-up, often stretched beyond the 6-minute mark, which (as far as I'm concerned) encourages listeners to just zone out and feel whatever they end up feeling, or picture whatever they end up picturing.

If you make it a few minutes in, and your visceral reaction is, "What the fuck is this shit?" then that probably either means that the album straight-up isn't for you, or you may not be in the right mood to listen to this kind of music. If, for example, you're feeling particularly sullen or pensive about life, I've found that it suits these moods rather well. Otherwise, it'll probably sound like the musical equivalent of wallpaper.

Because of how skeletal each and every track is, however, there's really not much else I can really say about it. If you do end up giving it a shot, though, just don't expect anything conventional.

7/10





Ned's Atomic Dustbin - Brainbloodvolume
Alternative rock
Final album

Here's an English band with a mildly interesting attribute: they have two bass players, one who plays the low tones, and one who players higher up on the scale. I liked their first two albums just fine, but their sound seemed a little too frenetic and upbeat for my tastes. The music they make is considered "grebo," which I had to look up. Wikipedia describes it as a crazy combination of punk, EDM, hip hop, and psychedelia.

With the possible exception of hip hop, I can definitely hear all of those genres on Brainbloodvolume, and while the experiments don't always result in something that sounds great, it actually does occur on this record far more often than it does not.

In spite of what the cover may suggest, this is a very colorful, punchy, and exciting rock album. Yet, it's also very straightforward in a way that I find very refreshing. Some of the stickiest grooves I've ever heard (at least, within the confines of this project) can be found on this record, and I'm still revisiting some of my favorite cuts well after my first listen. I'd check it out if I were you.

YouTube

8/10





The Tea Party - The Edges of Twilight
Progressive blues?
Third album

I think this is a great record, too, and I'm about to give it a strong recommendation as well, but it comes with a couple of asterisks tacked on, because this is a band that loves to wear their influences on the sleeve. Similar to a Greta Van Fleet, their early work sounds a LOT like a more bluesy Led Zeppelin if Jim Morrison was their lead singer instead (or maybe Sully Erna, depending on the song), and your ability to tolerate that sort of thing will probably inform how much you'll tolerate the band's work.

This record in particular was made partly as a reaction to that very criticism, where they do try to employ a lot of Middle Eastern instruments and other influences of world music into their sound. I think, for the most part, it pays off.

However, there are moments where it seems like they're overcompensating for their lack of originality a bit, and there's at least two moments where a ballad latches onto a nice mood or atmosphere, maybe with some unique-sounding instruments, only for them to fuck it up by injecting some ill-fitting blues rock hook with some overwrought crooning into the mix (like in the song "Correspondence," or "Turn the Lamp Down Low"), which rarely does anything but ruin the song for me.

"Ruin" might be a strong word, actually, but I do honestly think that the songs would be improved if you took out the cheesy blues breakdowns in the chorus. They just don't feel like they belong.

However, you still have a lot of genuinely great cuts on the record that exhibit not only great overall musicianship, but offer enough world influence and general artistic pomp to make you feel smart and cultured for listening to it. I rather adore "The Badger" as an instrumental cut, for example. "Shadows on the Mountainside" and "Inanna" are awesome, too, with the latter being my favorite song on the album, and all the remaining tracks are pretty solid, as well, especially "Fire in the Head," "The Bazaar," and "Silence."

There's not a bad song on the album, really. There are just some ideas that work well and some that don't, similar to the previously-discussed Brainbloodvolume. Only here, the ideas work a little bit less often.

Overall, this is a difficult one for me to rate. I won't give it a 7/10, but know that I'm not trying to put it up on the same level as the Swans record, or even the Ned's Atomic Dustbin record. It's teetering on the edge, but I think it has JUST enough to merit an 8/10. I might even change my mind later, but that's what I'm sticking with for now.

YouTube

8/10





Monster - Dopes to Infinity
Stoner rock
Third album

I want to dislike this album more than I do, just because I normally hate this genre, and Dopes to Infinity is probably the stupidest album title ever. One of its songs is also the namesake of Negasonic Teenage Warhead, who may not a lame character in and of herself, but she DOES make me think of those horrible Deadpool movies, which I fucking despise. So, basically everything about this album gives me really bad vibes.

In spite of my prejudice, though, it's not actually bad at all. It's pretty good if you like super heavy and super sludgy spaced-out rock music that's made for people who smoke pot religiously, and the more I relisten to some of the better tracks on it, the more difficult it becomes to deny that fact. There were multiple times where I was thinking to myself, "Okay, fine, that was a pretty good song," and it wasn't before long that those moments added up until I simply couldn't deny that I had just listened to a pretty good record. Especially after I heard the song "Ego the Living Planet," another song title with Marvel comic connections. I love any song that's able to turn decidedly unmusical things (like bloodcurdling screams of agony) into something distinctly musical.

You can't force me to keep saying nice things about it, though.

YouTube

7/10



Next up:

Blessid Union of Souls
Railroad Jerk
Death
Morphine
Headstones

Elton John, too, if he didn't have a billion albums.
Last Edit: April 19, 2019, 11:55:15 AM by Verbatim